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Frühling Blumen - Spring flowers

Frühling Blumen - Spring flowers

Frühlingsblumen Märzbecher mit Schmetterling - Spring flowers with butterfly

Frühlingsblumen Märzbecher mit Schmetterling - Spring flowers with butterfly

Frühling Blumen - spring flowers

Frühling Blumen - spring flowers

rhamphotheca:

Why Skunks Stink But Meerkats Don’t

by

Why some animals use noxious scents while others live in social groups to defend themselves against predators is the question that biologists sought to answer through a comprehensive analysis of predator-prey interactions among carnivorous mammals and birds of prey.

“The idea is that we’re trying to explain why certain antipredator traits evolved in some species but not others,” says biologist Theodore Stankowich of California State University, Long Beach.

The findings appear in the online edition of the journal Evolution.

Stankowich notes that this study not only explains why skunks are stinky and why banded mongooses live in groups but also breaks new ground in the methodology of estimating predation risks.

Stankowich, Tim Caro of University of California, Davis, and Paul Haverkamp, a geographer who recently completed his PhD at UC Davis, collected data on 181 species of carnivores, a group in which many species are small and under threat from other animals…

(read more: Futurity)

images: T - Vex/Flickr, B - fieldsbh/Flickr

ichthyologist:

Flying Fish 
Flying fish are known for their ability to glide through air, which is useful for escaping water-bound predators. To launch itself out of the water, the fish flicks its powerful tail up to 70 times per second. It then spreads its pectoral fins and tilts them upwards, providing lift. They can glide at least 400 m (1,300 ft) and at speeds of more than 70 km/h (43 mph).
Mike Prince on Flickr

ichthyologist:

Flying Fish

Flying fish are known for their ability to glide through air, which is useful for escaping water-bound predators. To launch itself out of the water, the fish flicks its powerful tail up to 70 times per second. It then spreads its pectoral fins and tilts them upwards, providing lift. They can glide at least 400 m (1,300 ft) and at speeds of more than 70 km/h (43 mph).

Mike Prince on Flickr

(via rhamphotheca)

rhamphotheca:

Houston Audubon Beak of the Week:
 Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus)Family: (Troglodytidae) WrensCarolina Wrens are common in woodlands and wooded urban areas throughout the Upper TX Coast. Their ringing teakettle-teakettle song is easy to identify even when the bird is not seen. They prefer foraging in the lower understory of woodlands. Males and females look alike. Males build nests in various locations to attract a mate. Once he has attracted a female, she usually proceeds to build her own nest, ignoring all his attempts. Sometimes Carolina Wrens use nest boxes, but they often prefer eave overhangs and more unusual spots, particularly hanging baskets. Photograph by Ben Hulsey

(via: Houston Audubon)

rhamphotheca:

Houston Audubon Beak of the Week:
Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus)

Family: (Troglodytidae) Wrens

Carolina Wrens are common in woodlands and wooded urban areas throughout the Upper TX Coast. Their ringing teakettle-teakettle song is easy to identify even when the bird is not seen. They prefer foraging in the lower understory of woodlands. Males and females look alike.

Males build nests in various locations to attract a mate. Once he has attracted a female, she usually proceeds to build her own nest, ignoring all his attempts. Sometimes Carolina Wrens use nest boxes, but they often prefer eave overhangs and more unusual spots, particularly hanging baskets.

Photograph by Ben Hulsey
Ein Dompfaff (männlich), auch Gimpel genannt, sitzt im Astwerk einer alten Magnolie

Ein Dompfaff (männlich), auch Gimpel genannt, sitzt im Astwerk einer alten Magnolie